American Women's History: A Research Guide
Feminism & Women's Rights
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Bibliographies

Kerns, Kathy, and Sally Willson Weimer. Feminist Movements in the U.S. [online]. Revised by Megan Adams. Collection Development Core Lists. [Chicago]: Women's Studies Section, Association of College & Research Libraries, 2000; distributed by University of Wisconsin System Women's Studies Librarian's Office. Available from: http://www.library.wisc.edu/libraries/WomensStudies/core/crfemmov.htm.

Kinnard, Cynthia D. Antifeminism in American Thought: An Annotated Bibliography. Boston, Mass.: G.K. Hall, c1986.

Ryan, Barbara. The Women's Movement: References and Resources. New York: G.K. Hall, c1996.


Biographical Sources

Scanlon, Jennifer, ed. Significant Contemporary American Feminists: A Biographical Sourcebook. Greenwood, 1999.


Encyclopedias

Boles, Janet K., and Diane Long Hoeveler. Historical Dictionary of Feminism. Historical Dictionaries of Religions, Philosophies, and Movements, no. 6. Scarecrow, 1996.

Harlan, Judith. Feminism: A Reference Handbook. ABC-Clio, 1998.


Primary Sources: Digital Collections

Agents of Social Change: Lesson Plans and Primary Documents from the 20th Century for Middle and High School Students [online]. Northampton, MA: The Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College, c2001 [cited 10 March 2002]. Available from: http://www.smith.edu/libraries/libs/ssc/curriculum/index.html.
Students can use original documents to study the influence of feminists (e.g., Dorothy Kenyon and Gloria Steinem) and feminist organizations (e.g., National Congress of Neighborhood Women).

Documents from the Women's Liberation Movement. Durham, N.C.: Special Collections Library, Duke University, April 1997 [cited 6 March 1998]. Available from: http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/wlm/.

Radical Women in Gainesville [online]. Gainesville: University of Florida Libraries, [2007]. Available from: http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/UFDC/?s=rwg.
This collection documents the history of the Women's Liberation Movement in Gainesville. It includes newsletters, brochures, correspondence, and other documents.

Women - Dare We Not Discriminate? [online]. Harvard Law School Forum, 18 February 1966. Available from: http://www.law.harvard.edu/studorgs/forum/audio.html.
Speakers included Betty Friedan, Mary I. Bunting, and Pauli Murray.


Primary Sources: Microform Collections

Herstory. Wooster, Ohio: Bell & Howell, 1972- .
Reviewed by Pamela Piddington in Microform Review 2 (January 1973): 48-49.
Periodicals from the women's movement from 1956 to 1974.


Primary Sources: Selected Books

Sherman, Janann, ed. Interviews with Betty Friedan. Conversations with Public Intellectuals Series. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2002.

Sigerman, Harriet, ed. The Columbia Documentary History of American Women Since 1941. New York: Columbia University Press, 2003. 690p.

Thom, Mary, ed. Letters to Ms., 1972-1987. New York : H. Holt, c1987. 264p.


Talking About Women's History

Brownmiller, Susan. In Our Time [Interview online]. Relax With a Book, n.d. Available from: http://www.relaxwithabook.com/home/index.cfm.

Cobble, Dorothy Sue. Working Class Feminism: The Other Women's Movement [online]. Interviewed by George Liston Seay. Talking History, 8 June 2000.

Horowitz, Daniel. Betty Friedan and the Making of The Feminine Mystique [Interview online]. Interviewed by Lisa Kannenberg. Talking History, 9 December 1999. Available from: http://www.albany.edu/talkinghistory/arch99july-december.html.

Kerber, Linda. Women's History [online]. Interviewed by Fred Nielsen. Talking History, 15 September 2003. Available from: http://talkinghistory.oah.org/arch2003.html.




American Women's History: A Research Guide

Ken Middleton
kmiddlet@frank.mtsu.edu
Middle Tennessee State Univ. Library
Murfreesboro, TN 37132