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Adirondacks Introduction | Geology | Glaciation | Resources
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Adirondacks province, smallest of the 28 main provinces in the United States, lies entirely in northeastern New York, occupying about one-fifth of the area of the state.  The eastern border of the province is the Lake Champlain-Lake George region, coinciding with a portion of the New York-Vermont border; this is the most distinctive boundary of the province.  On the south there are finger-like ridge extensions of the Adirondacks that generally terminate at the Mohawk Valley or associated lowlands; the Black River Valley and Tug Hill mark the southwestern extent.  The northern edge of the province is slightly south of Canada; in the northwest the province slopes gradually down to the St. Lawrence Valley. 
The Adirondacks contain the most rugged topography and highest elevations in New York; only in the western/northwestern portion of the province is the topography not mountainous, being more plateau-like.  Most of the province is a somewhat circular dome slightly more than 100 miles in diameter.  Although the eastern part of the province is less than 40 miles from the Green Mountains of Vermont, which are part of the Appalachian Mountain system, the Adirondacks are not considered part of the Appalachians.  Instead, the basement rocks of the Adirondacks, which are among the oldest rocks in New York and of Precambrian age, are an extension of the Laurentian Highlands (also called Laurentian Uplands and Laurentian Plateau), which are the dissected southern edge of the Grenville province, the eastern edge of the Canadian Shield.  These basement rocks also extend into the United States in the Superior Upland province. 
 
 Adirondacks Introduction | Geology | Glaciation | Resources