PHIL 4150: Formal Logic
 
Syllabus
 
Spring 2009

 
Index:InstructorObjectivesTextsTopics
AssignmentsAttendanceGradesExamsDisabilities


Course Objectives
The course is designed as an introduction to the theory of formal systems for students without any specialtraining in mathematics or computer science. Primary emphasis will be placed on the role of formal analysis in the representation and evaluation of natural language arguments. Initially, students will learn to manipulate the apparatus of propositional and first-order predicate logics; subsequently, an introduction to the scope and limits of alternative logical systems will be presented; finally, selected topics in the philosophy of logic will also be introduced.

Texts

Required Texts

The following texts are required; a thorough familiarity with their contents is advised:

  • Hausman, Alan, Paul Tidman, and Howard Kahane.  Logic and Philosophy: A Modern Introduction. Tenth Edition. Belmont CA: Wadsworth/Thompson Learning, Inc., 2006.
  • Hofstadter, Douglas R.  Godel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid. New York: Basic Books, 1999.
                       
Recommended Texts

The following texts are recommended for those students who wish to advance their philosophical understanding or abilities:
  • Bell, John L., David DeVidi, and Graham Solomon.  Logical Options: An Introduction to Classical and Alternative Logics. Peterborough, Ontario: Broadview Press, 2001.
  • Quine, W.V.O.  Philosophy of Logic. Harvard, Harvard University Press, 1986.
  • Sainsbury, Mark.  Logical Forms: An Introduction to Philosophical Logic. Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell, Inc., 1991.


Course Division

(1) ARGUMENTS AND APPARATUS
        Readings:Hausman et al., Chapters 1 & 2.                         
        Exercises & Exams: 1 Exercise Set.

(2) SENTENTIAL LOGIC: METHODS, SCOPE, AND LIMITS
        Readings:Hausman et al., Chapters 3 - 6; Hofstadter, Part I
        Exercises & Exams:2 Exercise sets; EXAM #1.

(3) PREDICATE LOGIC: METHODS, SCOPE, AND LIMITS
        Readings:Hausman et al., Chapters 7 - 13; Hofstadter, Part I
        Exercises & Exams:2 Exercise Sets; EXAM #2.

(4) ALTERNATIVE LOGICS
        Readings:                               Hausman et al., Chapter 18; Bell, et al., Chapters 2.4 6.1.

(5) PHILOSOPHY AND FORMALIZATION
        Readings:         Hofstadter, Part II; Quine, Chapters 1-7; Sainsbury , 1-6.
        Exercises & Exams:        EXAM #3.

Assignments
For the most part, reading assignments will be made on a daily basis. Inasmuchas the lecture and discussion periods will ordinarily focus finely on the technical apparatus presented in the required text,it is essential that you keep well abreast of the readings. Exercises will generally beassigned at least one calendar week before coming due; however, exercises will be accepted for credit ONLY on or before the assigned days. The purpose of the exercises is to prepare you for the exams, so if you miss one, you may wish to secure a copy from someone else in the class. Examination Periods will be announced at least one calendar week in advance.

Attendance
All students are expected to attend all class periods.

Grades
All exercises and exams will be graded using a numerical scale. Final greades sent to theregistrar are based on cumulative average performance, according to the schedule provided below.

Schedule of Exercises and Exams

NAME TOPIC TOTAL POINTS GRADEPERCENT CUM. PERCENT
Exercise #1 Apparatus  18  6  6
Exercise #2 Sentential Logic-1  18  6 12
Exercise #3 Sentential Logic-2  18  6 18
Exercise #4 Predicate Logic-1  18  6 24
Exercise #5 Predicate Logic-2  18  6 30
EXAM #1 SENTENTIAL LOGIC  84 28 58
EXAM #2 PREDICATE LOGIC  84  28 86
EXAM #3 LOGIC AND PHILOSOPHY  42 14 100

Accomodation for Students with Disabilities
If you have a disability that may require assistance or accommodation, or you have questions related to any accommodations for testing, note takers, readers, etc., please speak with your instructor as soon as possible. Students may also contact the Office of Disabled Students Services (898-2783) with questions about such services.




Instructor Information

Instructor:RonBombardi
Department ofPhilosophy
Middle Tennessee StateUniversity
Email: Ron Bombardi
Office:James Union Building: Room 307
Telephone:615-898-2049
Office Hours:8:00-9:00 & 10:05-11:25, MWF;
and by appointment








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